Temperament Corner: March/April

Updated: Jun 16


Youth, Temperament, and Stress

By: Dr Phyllis J. Arno


Dr. Phyllis J. Arno

We are continuing the series titled Youth, Temperament and Stress. In this issue we will review some of the “Stress Triggers” in the Inclusion area of the Phlegmatic youth. We will specifically cover “stress” in the home and in school.


In review, the Inclusion area is the need to establish and maintain a satisfactory relationship with people in the area of surface relationships, associations and socialization and intellectual energies.




Word Review of the Phlegmatic Youth in Inclusion

  • slow-paced

  • observer

  • calm

  • easy-going

  • task-oriented

  • dry humor

  • stubborn

  • tolerates people

  • selfish

  • efficient

  • protects their energy

  • avoid confrontation


STRESS TRIGGERS – HOME


1. LACK OF REST


Because of their low energy, this youth needs to have time to rest after school. Parents need to be taught that this Phlegmatic youth in Inclusion will become irritable and may make cutting (biting) remarks if they do not receive adequate rest.


2. ACCUSATIONS OF BEING LAZY, ESPECIALLY AFTER SCHOOL

Teach the parents that this Phlegmatic youth in Inclusion has a low energy level. Their optimum level might be considered unacceptable to the parents, and they are often accused of being lazy.


3. DYSFUNCTIONAL FAMILY - PARENTS - DRUGS/ALCOHOL


Encourage the parents to seek help in getting off drugs and alcohol so that this youth will not become a drug addict or alcoholic. If the drugs are readily available, think of what an escape this would be for a Phlegmatic! Remember:


CHILDREN HAVE NEVER BEEN GOOD AT LISTENING TO THEIR ELDERS, BUT THEY HAVE NEVER FAILED TO IMITATE THEM!

James Baldwin


4. BLENDED OR SINGLE FAMILY - SIBLING RIVALRY


In a single parent family, where one parent needs to be mom and dad, how can they prevent sibling rivalry? By giving each youth quality time—not necessarily quantity time and also by finding a person the parent can trust to be a mentor for this youth.


Enlighten the parents as to how there is a “pecking order” and that when families are blended, there may be two first borns, two last borns, etc., so each youth will be fighting to maintain their position. This can create problems such as anger, jealousy, resentment, etc., and can bring stress to the blended family. Since this youth is a Phlegmatic in Inclusion, their siblings may feel that this youth is not doing their share of the work, etc. Parents must remember to be open to listen to “all sides” of their disputes.



5. SEXUAL ABUSE - BABYSITTERS, SIBLINGS, RELATIVES, ETC.


Teach the parents to encourage the Phlegmatic in Inclusion youth to come to them with any and all problems they may be encountering.


They will need to encourage the Phlegmatic in Inclusion youth to share with them as the Phlegmatic youth in Inclusion usually will not volunteer information readily; they do not want to expend the energy.


Parents also need to look for signs such as irritability, overeating, cutting themselves, using drugs, drinking alcohol, etc.



5. AVAILABILITY OF ADULT MOVIES, TELEVISION AND THE INTERNET


Teach the parents to be aware of what the Phlegmatic in Inclusion youth is watching on television and what movies they are seeing. They also need to be aware of what they are doing on the computer. This Phlegmatic in Inclusion youth needs boundaries. This kind of activity takes very little energy, and they can easily use this as their escape from people and tasks!



Parents Need to Become Cyber Savvy!

ELEMENTARY SCHOOL